What Is The ATR Indicator & How Do You Use It When Trading ...

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

Day #2 of my Forex Journey

Real quick before I get into my next steps of my FX Journey, id like to say thank you to all the people who commented on my last post! All of the tips I got were really eye-opening and introduced me to different parts of FX trading that I didn't even know existed. So thank you so much, and I hope to get more interesting feedback from you guys in the future! Also Im going to probably change my writing frequency from daily to biweekly. I think writing about every little trade is not going to be as beneficial to me as writing about my overall progress at certain points throughout the week.
I started this trading day out by learning up on order flow. A whole bunch of you guys suggested really interesting youtubers to watch, and I started with Mr. pip's series on order flow. After I finished up watching a few of his videos, I started to tweak my trading plan so that I could get in some chart time. I changed currency pair from EUUSD to the AUD/USD, the time frame from the 4 hour to the 1 hour, and my indicators from RSI, Stochastic, 2 SMAs and ADX to ATR, RSI, and Ichimoku Kinko Hyo. I also added a little fundamental analysis in my trading plan because I think that I am being far too reliant on my indicators. I planned to check the economic calendar and determine the general trend of the currency pairs that are strongly correlated to the AUD/USD before I began my chart analysis. In addition to all of my analysis, I tried to practice using the techniques I learned in Mr. Pip's videos and analyze the order flow of the chart. Even if my analysis of order flow is wrong, as long as I am getting practice I am learning.
Eventhough I planned to use today to back-test indicators and find a solid new plan, I did not have enough time. I ended up getting on my demo account really late in the day, and started to force myself to enter a trade. Destructive habits like this could lead into some massive issues when I eventually get into live trading. To combat this harmful attitude specifically, I will restrict myself to trading on certain parts of the day (for example session overlaps, news releases, and earlier in the day). Despite this mistake I still continued with my trading strategy. I calculated all the currency correlations for AUS/USD using the past weeks economic data, and set my indicators in place. After checking the overall trend of the most strongly correlated pairs (Positive: EUUSD, GPB/USD, Negative: USD/CAD, USD/JPY) I started to analyze the order flow. All the correlated currencies, except for EUUSD, indicated that the AUD/USD would fall, while my order flow analysis indicated the opposite. Seeing as though I am extremely new to order flow, I dismissed this analysis, and ended up forcing a trade on the AUD/USD going short when my indicators seemed to line up correctly. I learned from last time that I should not alter or close my trade purely based on emotion, and to just wait till the market hits my stop loss or take profit. I included a trailing stop loss of 60 pips this time, but I have no evidence to base that number range on. The trade is currently open and I am down about 30 pips.
Although I am not labeling this trade as a loser yet, I can definitely see a lot of holes in my trading strategy. The most obvious mistake in my eyes right now is my use of indicators. Currently all my trades are purely based on what my indicators say, and since I do not have any back-tested data to support the credibility of my indicators, it feels a lot like strategic gambling. Another issue is that I feel far too reliant on indicators alone. I think that if I can find ways to include various types of analysis efficiently and evenly in my trading plan I will become a much more skillful and well-rounded trader. In order to combat these two issues I will begin forming various types of trading strategies this weekend and back-test them all extensively. I also plan on researching more on price action, order flow, and Naked Forex.
Once again any and all feedback is welcome. I am just beginning Forex, but it had been a huge passion of mine and I don't plan on stopping anytime soon.
submitted by Aman-1127 to Forex [link] [comments]

WHAT’S THE BEST FOREX INDICATOR?

So you've begun forex exchanging and are amped up for how a lot of cash you're going to make, you should simply stall out in. In any case, when would it be advisable for you to exchange? Where would it be a good idea for you to enter? Which money sets would it be advisable for you to take a gander at?

Envision if there was an answer that let you know precisely when to enter an exchange!
New kid on the block dealer, meet Mr. Marker. Disregard those senseless climbing ashy candles, that poo is simply excessively mind boggling.
What on earth is a bullish overwhelming flame development at any rate? I'm a new kid on the block, I don't have a clue, or care, I simply need to make cash damn it! Demonstrate to me the most straightforward approach to make cash at the present time!
Sound commonplace?
These mystical pointers will guide you. Like a Magic 8-ball. They'll demonstrate to you the route to the heavenly place that is known for forex magnificence, where the avenues are cleared in green pips, and everybody you meet gives you a bar of bullion, since you merit it.
It helps me to remember my most loved Guns n Roses track "Bring me down to the heaven city where the pips are green and the diagrams are beautiful, goodness won't you please take me home, hold up ouw"
In this way, what precisely is a MACD, CCI, ATR, RSI or a ridiculous Stochastic!
They all solid so logical; without a doubt they should be great?
All things considered, I'm sorry to learn your air pocket… yet this is simply one more approach to peruse value developments in the market (a few brokers like to call this value activity). A marker is parcel more like salt and pepper than Colonel Sanders 12 mystery herbs and flavors.
On the off chance that you just learn one thing today, make it this: As merchants, we just approach a constrained measure of data.
These are the main two things we know without a doubt:
What cost is presently?
What cost was 1min, 5mins, 15mins, 1hr (you get the thought) prior
That is it.
All markers are doing is demonstrating to you this data in an alternate organization.
Presently, for all the pointer fans out there, you'll be satisfied to know it's not all foolishness. Pointers are intended to indicate past examples in the market that probably won't be anything but difficult to see with the stripped eye. What's more, the hypothesis goes, in the event that you can distinguish an example from an earlier time, at that point you'll have the capacity to anticipate what's to come. In any case, that is a discussion for one more day.
Will forex dealers foresee what's to come? That is an incredible theme for my next blog entry… hold tight, let me record that…
Alright, I'm back. Presently, the current theme – Which pointer would it be advisable for you to utilize?
Whichever one you need.
Apologies, I realize that is most likely a bit of disappointing…
All it's doing is demonstrating to you what you definitely know (present and past market cost) in an alternate visual configuration. So discover a pointer you see, at that point stay with it.
My solitary suggestion is to abstain from running different pointers without a moment's delay since you'll likely befuddle yourself.
Picture result for MT4 window with pointers
It would appear that it's a great opportunity to purchase, sell, hold and turn.
By and by, I like to exchange bare. That is correct, starker's.
Why?
You will probably discover once you watch the graphs for a considerable length of time, you won't require the spiritualist Ichimoku Cloud to furnish you with a climate figure. You'll have the capacity to gaze toward the sky and tell for yourself whether you'll require an umbrella for the session ahead.
Contact: https://hawksfx.com, +44 208 638 8973.
Head Office
Kemp House, 152 - 160 City Road, London EC1V 2NX United Kingdom
Asian Branch
19/1, Sri Sumanarama Road,
Mount Lavinia, Sri Lanka
submitted by Hawksfx to u/Hawksfx [link] [comments]

How I use Volatility to my advantage (UK US open, late US etc)

[Only applies to M30 and lower]
What is volatility?
Volatility is the degree of variation in price of a given asset on a defined timeframe. When price moves quickly, market volatility increases. When price consolidates, market volatility decreases (simple definition). It is like the speedometer in our cars.
I usually add an Average True Range (ATR) on my charts to gauge approximately market volatility or market nervousness. However, it is not necessary, when you look at a chart you are able to tell if price is spiking, trending or consolidating.
Volatility is part of any strategy. It gives an expectancy toward future price action. In general, when market volatility is low, we expect significant support and resistance levels to hold price in a range. And when market volatility is high, we expect price to break these levels.
Volatility patterns
Fortunately, in the Forex market, daily volatility is predictable. We tend to see volatility peaks around major markets openings, which are the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), the London Stock Exchange (LSE) and the Japanese Exchange. At the late hours of these markets, volatility tends to decrease.
These fundamental patterns are the most exploitable patterns in the Forex market. Yes, at least more exploitable than deceitful technical signals you are looking for. And they happen almost every day. However, there are exceptions. For example, we do not expect volatility peak to happen when countries of these big markets are on bank holiday.
EURUSD hourly volatility
The chart above shows the 4-weeks hourly volatility for the EUUSD pair. It is the average in pip of the difference between the highest and the lowest price of each hour of the day, over four weeks. Each bar represents the average in hourly range over four weeks.
There are two major peaks corresponding to the LSE and the NYSE openings.
Since the EUUSD is the most traded pair, we consider its volatility as "market volatility". In fact, the hourly volatility chart of the other pairs gives approximately the same pattern.
USDCAD hourly volatility
These charts were taken in May 2016. Take a look at Mataf.net’s volatility tool and type four (for four weeks) in the entry box. You will see approximately this same pattern in hourly volatility, with the two major peaks (UK and US opens) and decreasing volatility starting from the mid-US session. (Currently the pattern is disturbed by the brexit monster volatility, it will become clear again within few weeks)
We also have decreased volatility during the Asian session when there is no major news release coming from the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) or the Bank Of Japan (BOJ).
Asian sessions
These charts tell us market volatility is predictable. This leads us to define two principles:
First Principle: Around major markets openings (active time), market volatility tends to surge. We expect to see range breakouts, spikes or rallies. It is the best time to trade breakouts i.e., buying new highs and selling new lows.
Second Principle: During the late hours of major markets sessions and when major markets are closed (quiet time), market volatility tends to decrease considerably. We expect to see trading range or congestion in price action. It is the best time to range-trade i.e., buying the lows and selling the highs.
principles
Any trading strategy or system has to adapt to these variations in volatility to perform over time. If you are struggling with a particular strategy, maybe you are ignoring these changes in volatility.
How volatility patterns can help in improving your trading?
One cannot apply a strategy any time and expect to be profitable. When we simulate an automated and intraday trading system over three months without time filtering, we will notice the system is only profitable at certain hours of the day. This simply reflects intraday volatility variations.
You have to determine if your trading strategy is a trend following method or a range trading one.
If your strategy is a trend following approach, you will want to only trade around major markets openings to maximize profits. Otherwise, you will tend to give back profits as price slows down in the mid-session and market volatility decrease.
If your strategy is a range trading or reversal approach, you will want to only trade during quiet market time and avoid trading around market openings or around news releases.
Less trades maximize profits. Most of my trading sessions last less than one hour.
I made a portable document of this.
submitted by alm_hd to Forex [link] [comments]

Top Forex Trading tips and Strategies- 2018

Forex trading is completely bounded by the economy of the currency pair. Forex trading is not a kind of business where you can take spontaneous decisions to run your business. It needs a thoughtful and strategic process with the emotional discipline to make any move in Forex trading. It is always said that a Forex trader must strive to develop his/her own trading strategy or try a strategy that has proven itself in past. Best Forex trading tips and strategies for 2018 can develop after multifaceted analysis of currency pairs and economy news. Here are some forex currency trading tips that will work in 2018:
1. Trading is an Art, not a Rocket Science:
You must remember that trading is an art, not a rocket science. No one can assure you for 100% accurate movement of any currency. Therefore, no rule in trading is ever absolute. You have to learn Art of trading. How the market reacts to the economic news? And how technical indicators work with those data?
2. Emotional Discipline:
Everyone knows about emotional discipline, but no one controls their emotions while trading which becomes a reason for the loss of trading. Emotional discipline keeps you on the track of successful trader. If you are trading with a strategic process and don’t have the emotional discipline you can lose your money on trading and we suggest you stop wasting time in trading. You can do more interesting in your life.
3. Don’t Get Greedy:
Forex trading is highly fluctuating trading system. You are making a good profit 1 min ago and next min you are having a loss. If you’re in profit and you are making good money with respect to your investment. Then don’t get greedy into making more profit. Just close the trade and have fun with your profit.
4. Risk Management:
Most of the people trade without risk management and wipe out their account. If you want to be a successful trader don’t forget to put proper risk to management in your trades. Trading is a kind of business if you are not able to lose money that you are investing. Please don’t put any trade in stocks, currency market.
5. RSI (Relative Strength Index) Indicator:
As you know it is a momentum indicator. It is used to understand the movement of the market. It also helps us to learn the trend of the market in particular time frame. But why we are suggesting to others to use in your toolkit. We know that market is run by investors and all investors need something to predict short terms and long-term movement of the market to make a good amount of profit. That’s why they use tools used by a majority of traders and RSI is one of the tools which is used by the majority.
6. ATR (Average True Range):
Most of the traders lose money in Forex trading not because they are trading against the trend, they lose money because they don’t what is stop loss and take profit they have to put while trading and ATR will help you to use a proper stop loss on your all trade so you can increase the number of profitable trade in your portfolio.
7. Stochastic Oscillator
Every trader must keep this tool in his/her toolkit. This tool will let you know about get-in and get-out price of your trade. If you are following the signals provided by this tool, you may lose most of your trades with good profit. It shows the overbought and oversold price of any currency, commodity, and stock. This range – from 0 to 100 – will remain constant, no matter how quickly or slowly a security advances or declines. Considering the most traditional settings for the oscillator, 20 are typically considered the oversold threshold and 80 are considered the overbought threshold. However, the levels are adjustable to fit security characteristics and analytical needs. Readings above 80 indicate a security is trading near the top of its high-low range; readings below 20 indicate the security is trading near the bottom of its high-low range.
8. Simple Moving Average:
The thing to remember about SMA is it helps you to determine the upcoming trend. It helps you to know upcoming the bullish trend and bearish trends in your currency trading.
Two popular trading patterns that use simple moving averages include the death cross and a golden cross. A death cross occurs when the 50-day simple moving average crosses below the 200-day moving average. This is considered a bearish signal that further losses are in store. The golden cross occurs when a short-term moving average breaks above a long-term moving average. Reinforced by high trading volumes, this can signal further gains are in store.
9. A risk to Reward Ratio:
Before entering every trade, you must know your pain threshold. You need to figure out what the worst-case scenario is and place your stop based on a monetary or technical level. Every trade, no matter how certain you are of its outcome, is an educated guess. Nothing is certain in trading. Reward, on the other hand, is unknown. When a currency moves, the move can be huge or small. Always trade in 1:2 risks to reward ratio. So if you lose two trade you, your one profit trade can recover your loss and put you in no loss- no profit situation.
10. Never Risk more than 5\% of your investment:
If you are a trader with the low budget in rang $100-$1000. Never put more than %5 of your total amount of investment. And if you have budget more than $1000 than please don’t get greedy and don’t put more than 2% on risk.
If you remember this rules and learn to use above mention tools properly. Definitely, you can make a good amount of money from your trades, without wiping out your account. Trading is subject to market risk. You can lose all money, so please trade safely and don’t get emotional.
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How to Use the ATR Indicator ATR How to read ATR in Forex - Average True Range Indicator Explained How to Use the Average True Range Indicator (ATR) 📈 - YouTube 2 Simple Ways To Use Average True Range (ATR) Indicator ... IV and ATR (Implied Volatility and Average True Range) ATR Indicator Strategies  Live Trading

The Average True Range (ATR) is a technical indicator that measures the volatility of an asset’s price.. Since ATR is a volatility indicator. it shows how much price fluctuates, on average, during a given time frame. It was introduced by Welles Wilder in his book, “New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems“. What’s incredible is that this book also includes the Parabolic SAR, RSI, and ... When a Forex trader knows how to read ATR, they can use current volatility to gauge the placement of stop and limit orders on existing positions. Today we will take a look at ATR and how to apply ... If you want an overly detailed definition with a bunch of history and stuff you can’t use, No Nonsense Forex is not the place. Go here instead. The ATR is actually very easy, and the part the 99% try and use to predict where price is going isn’t even the part you should be using. You’ll soon see. So for this example, I will use the default setting of 14. I use the default setting myself ... Die Average True Range - kurz ATR - ist einer der Standardindikatoren und ihr Einsatzgebiet ist äußerst vielfältig - gerade auch außerhalb der Generierung von Handelssignalen. Hier finden Sie ... ATR steht für „Average True Range“, was übersetzt die „durchschnittliche, echte Handelsspanne“ bedeutet. Die ATR ist ein Indikator der technischen Analyse, der die Marktvolatilität misst, indem er die gesamte Spanne eines Vermögenswertpreises (Aktie, Forex, etc). für diesen Zeitraum zerlegt. ATR Forex sizing works just as well as ATR commodity sizing, because volatility is a universal market concept. Because the ATR does not measure direction and simply considers the magnitude of range, it has limited utility as a means for generating trading signals. However, it is a useful tool for providing an idea about how much a market may ... Average true range (ATR) is a technical indicator measuring market volatility. It is typically derived from the 14-day moving average of a series of true range indicators.

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How to Use the ATR Indicator

FREE eBook: "How to Day Trade" Download Now: http://webinar.warriortrading.com/signup DISCLAIMER: http://www.warriortrading.com/disclaimer/ // Join our Fre... The average true range trading indicator measures the volatility in the instrument you are trading. Using the ATR can help you in many ways including as a fu... Using the Average True Range. http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/course/volume.html PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE THIS VIDEO SO WE CAN DO MORE! This lesson is a... How to read ATR in Forex - Average True Range Indicator Explained The Average True Range (ATR) is a simple yet very effective technical indicator, developed by the American mechanical engineer J ... LIVE Forex Trading - NY Session 27th July 2020 WicksDontLie 1,410 watching Live now How to use the ATR Indicator to Improve your Forex Entries & Exits - Duration: 12:18. How to add Chart Labels in ThinkorSwim (IV% Chart Label and ATR Chart Label) - Duration: 10:38. Tactical Options Trading 3,926 views. 10:38. How to Use the Average True Range Indicator (ATR ... For more information and to download a free version of FX Renew's custom ATR indicator for MT4 click here: http://fxrenew.com/forex-blog/the-surprising-usefu...

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